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Full text of "The Collegiate"

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THE 



COLLEGIATE 




1931-1932 






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For Reference 

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THE 

COLLEGIATE 




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Page One 



I93H32- 



WILSON 
North Carolina 



19311932 

Afc!anfcic Christian College Library' 



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C. L HARDY UfttyRY 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN, COLLEGE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



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I ORDER OF BOOKS I 

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.*. BOOK I .*. 

I The Colleffe | 

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X BOOK II X 

£ Classes & 






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X BOOK III X 

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Patfe Two 



2 5: 



FOREWORD 

I The purpose of the third volume is to present a 

g cross-section of our College days. The Staff has chosen 

i the high spots of '32 and preserved them for the future. 

f 

S In spite of our mistakes, we trust that this book will aid 

in recalling the bitter-sweet hours spent with our Alma 

| Mater. 



Page Three 



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MISS CHARLOTTE HILL, 



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DEDICATION 

BOTH AS AN ACKNOWLEDGE- 
MENT OF NEW FOUND INTEREST 
AND AS A TOKEN OF OUR LOVE 
WE GRATEFULLY DEDICATE 
THIS, THE THIRD VOLUME OF 
THE COLLEGIATE TO 
MISS CHARLOTTE HILL 



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Page Five 



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PRESIDENT H. S. HILLEY 



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FACULTY 1931-1932 



Howard S. Hilley 

F. F. Grim 

Elizabeth Edwards Yavorski 

J. M. Waters 

C. K. Holsapple 

Frances F. Harper 

Martha L Edmonston 

Nannelle Paulk Hinton 

F. A. Hodges 

C. H. Hamlin 

Mamie Jennings Lucas 

Charlotte Hill 

Myrtle L Harper 

Mrs. A. W. Haskins 

Mildred D. Ross 

Mrs. Julia Ross 



President, Professor of Ancient Languages 

Dean of College and Professor of Education 

Dean of Women, Instructor in Voices 

Professor of Bible 

Professor of English 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Modern Languages 

Professor of Piano and Theory 

Professor of Science, Coach 

Professor of Social Science 

Professor of Dramatics and Public Speaking 

Instructor in Physical Education and Science 

Librarian 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Registrar ^ 

Dietitian 



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THE SENIOR CLASS 



The freshman class four years ago is now the senior class, and is about to be 
honorably graduated from this, our Alma Mater. Our class has never been very 
large in number, but they have always been large in the activities of the college. 
We have been preparing ourselves for the last four yoars for the work that we 
intend to undertake on leaving Atlantic Christian College. We greatly apprec- 
iate averything that the college has done for us. 

OFFICERS 
President Sidney Eagles Vice President Clara Bass 

Secretary Elsie Meyers Treasure/ 

Student Council Representative D. E. Poole 



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X<^^'<"X<^<^«X»X"X«>X«:««;»<~X"X"X »X"X~X"X«X^^^^^X«X^«X«X~X»X~X"X"> 



I CLASS HISTORY OF 1932 | 

X In the fall of 1928 there entered Atlantic Christian College seventy-five of the A 

X usual greenhorns called Freshmen. We could not boast of being either the lar- *»* 

§ gest or the smallest class in the history of the institution, but we do claim to have •,♦ 

y had a group of up-and-going youngsters, seeking for priceless wisdom to carry .*. 

X back to the eight states which wa represented. One of these out-of-state boys X 

V was elected to lead us during the first year. His name was Jaspar Basart and y 

y y 

y he headed from Iowa. y 

X In the spring of our freshman year Vernon Bryant was promoted from vice- A 

X president to president. The fall of 1929 witnessed the return of fewer members *j* 

y cf our class, but nevertheless we lost none of the Sophomore sophistication. We y 

•!• saw that because we were fewer in number we had much more work to do. There- A 

X fore we set in with vim and determination, happy at the thought that we were no X 

y longer Freshmen, but Sophs, one fourth of the way on the journey to Graduation. y 

y This hard work was rewarded in due time when we were promoted to the Junior .*. 

X Class. Only a few fell along the way. A 

*t* Being a broadminded class and a class that believed in raising the political v 

y status of women, we saw in Clara Bass, one of the fairer sex, the qualities of lead- ••. 

X ership and elected her president. This year we welcomed into our class Trudie X 

X Dawson who had struggled hard both summer and winter, and was graduating in £ 

•|" three years. There also came into our class: D. E. Poole, Margaret Barfoot, Ida A 

A Crockett, Margaret Lawshe, Francis Lindler, and William Stamey Teachey, all whom A 

X had received previous training from other institutions. X 

y This year was marked by intellectual achievement and moral development. It y 

♦?• was also a year of social events, climaxed by the elaborate Junior-Senior Banquet A 

X held at the Wilson Country Club, attended by forty Seniors, thirty Juniors, President X 

*»* and Mrs. Hilley, Prof. Hodges, and Miss Cannaday. y 

y- The fourth and last year was begun under the leadership of Sidney Eagles. This A 

A made the third time in which our class president was a native of Wilson County. X 

*t* The return to college was a disappointment in one way. Looking about us, we y 

y *i* 

y were .unable to see all the faces that we had learned to connect with our o.ass. •> 

A A 

A Some, as Marie Autry, Ruth Watson, Ruby Banks, Mamie Harper, and Dorothy A 

X Slater had become tired of the regular pace we were running, and had forged on y 

t y 

•<» ahead to finish one year before us. Others had dropped out for various reasons. y 

*•* *** 

A Yet there was something that would partially compensate for our loss. That was A 

X the addition of new faces to our ranks. Charles Bissette, Walter Bridgers, and X 

y Bill Gillette loved the institution so much that they made arrangements to spend y 

»?« five years within her care, while Ila Soles and Frances Brantley, former Students A 

X of Atlantic Christian College, came back to graduate with us. Another one to join X 

£ our ranks was Louise Mashburn, a former student of George Washington Univer- V 

y sity. With these additions to our class we took our hard knocks with a smile, and y 

A worked hard for the best we could obtain from the last lap of our journey. The X 

X highest social spot this year was again the Junior-Senior Banquet. The Juniors £ 

y entertained us in royal fashion, decorating the banquet hall of the Briggs Hotel beau- y 

A tifully for the event. It was an occasion that will live in our memories far into A 

X the years *o come. X 

y And thus we came to the place called Graduation. Are we glad? Yes, in a y 

a way. But why should we ? The years have been a pleasure to us, and every emo- A 

X tion we possess has cried out in the free vibrant spirit of youth. Yet we must move X 

y on. There are those who must take our places, and there are places we must take V 

y in the wider trails beyond Graduation. A 

A Vernon Bryant, Class Historian X 

A 

Page Eleven 



X 



X 



is being given in honor of Mrs. John Strickland who is home from St. Louis to spend 



.■*>♦.>'.<•.> 



|: CLASS PROPHECY f 

I I 

A During the past semester Sahab Swami, the Hindu mystic visited our illus- y 

X trious college and performed numerous miracles before our incredulous eyes. I was A 

¥ very much interested in the Indian miracle man and followed him back stage hoping X 

y to see more of his wonders. I asked him if he could foretell the future and he re- g 

A plied that he had a magic mirror which at certain times and for certain people would & 

X picture the future. I told hdm I was very anxious to see what was going to happen X 

y to my classmates of '32 in five years. He very graciously consented to take m; £ 

A through the magic preliminaries and left me alone in a strange room before a queer y 

X little mirror. As in a moving picture I saw my classmates playing the serious A 

£ game of life in 1937. X 

♦*♦ The first thing I saw was a gold-lsttered sign on a mahogany door— "Dr. Sidney X 

A S. Eagles — Office Hours 2:00 to 5:00." The door opened and I glimpsed the little ft 

X doctor wearing horn rimmed glasses. He was at the telephone and he took the big A 

y cigar from his mouth long enough to say, "I'll be home Mary Liz, just as soon as I X 

A get rid of these patients." y 

A In the waiting room I saw a very impressive looking lady endeavoring to make A 



X a small boy with his arm in a sling sit still. It was none other than Mrs. Tom A 

•♦* Banks, formerly Miss Trudie Dawson. From her prosperous look Tom must have y 

v y 

•♦♦ realized his ambition in professional athletics. y 

,t. The doctor's office faded and in its place came a good looking school building. A 

y I could see the principal's office and the man at the desk was— Bill Gillette. A X 

A teacb2r came in with an order for history books. It was Frances Brantley and my y 

X attention was drawn to a very beautiful diamond which she was wearing conspiciously. A 

V The school faded and I saw soft lights, deep chairs, people in evening clothes. A 



y I heard music, laughter, conversation. I recognized Ethellynn Brown, prominent *** 

A in social welfare work. She was looking very happy and was talking very earn- A 

A v 

X estly with a distinguished looking man who is also familiar. I saw Vernon Bryant A 

y who is being introduced as Professor of English at Texas University. Near him is X 

A a striking blond lady who is reputed to be an authority on Anglo-Saxon Grammar y 

X and British History. Everyone seems to be just a little timid before her intellect- A 

y uality. It is Margaret Barfoot. The party is — yes, it is in Black Creek, and it X 



X a few weeks with her parents and friends. The guest of honor is talking, as usual. A 

y Just now she is conversing with a smiling, rather portly gentleman with a small X 

A moustache. It is T. E. Autry and from their conversation I learn that he is a pros- y 

A perous drug store proprietor. A 

X The scene shifted to a pretty little village church where I saw the sleek head of A 



{• D. E. Poole bending above the scripture reading in the Sunday morning service. I ,*, 

| saw Mrs. Baggette and Ila Soles in the audience. I learned they were both teach- y 

£ ing in the high school and were enjoying their work immensely. A 

£ The scene changed swiftly showing Evelyn Batts at the librarian's desk in the X 

A Wilson County Library, Charlie Bissette taking his seat in the State Legislature in at 

A Raleigh, and Margaret Bryan as a society leader in Durham. Then came a smart ♦*• 

X little car operated by Miss Lou Mashburn who is furthering the Little Theater Move- X 

y I wanted to stay to see more, but Sahab Swami came to tell me my time was X 

A mpTlt in tTna crnnrt r»lH Mnrth Citato A 



ment in the good old North State. y 

v 
?, up. Reluctantly, I came away to write down the mirror's message. A 

£ Elsie Meyers X 

•♦♦ Class Prophet *»' 



Page Twelve 



hX~>:~k«:«:« >:~:~:~:~:~:~:«:~:~:~:«:~k-:~:«m«:^ ' 

y X 

I Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1932 f 

v X 

Y We, the Class of 1932 of Atlantic Christian College, being- in good bodily health, S 

9 and of sound and disposing mind and memory, according to local phrenologists and y 

& alienists, realizing that the last step up the great ladder of College Education has •*♦ 

X been taken successfully, do hereby make and declare this document as our Last Will X 

¥ and Testament. We earnestly desire that our executors, herein named shall carry V 

9 Y 

y out this, our Last Will and Testament in the following manner: y 

£ If we should be so unfortunate and insignificant as to die leaving some of our y 

•{• friends on the wrong side of the ledger, please settle the same and give tbem our y 

X regards. Conduct our funeral with all the pomp, glory, and dignity of a Student .$. 

*:* Association Meeting on Saturday morning. X 



.'. FIRST:- To our beloved and noble Alma Mater we leave our undying gratitude •!• 

£ for the many gracious services which she has rendered us since we entered her X 

't* spacious doors of learning as ignorant and green freshmen. ¥ 

'»* Y 

SECOND:- To the Juniors we leave our numerous and sundry privileges; how- Y, 

y ever, as we have never received any, we can only hope that said Juniors may be much y 

£ more fortunate in receiving their due privileges than we have been. •*. 

•*« * * 

•j. THIRD:- To the rising Seniors we also leave the privilege of setting good ex- & 

% amples of behavior, our surplus senior dignity, and the front seats in Chapel. X 

X FOURTH:- To the Student Body we leave our use of the buildings and campus, X 

y and, last but not least, our claim on th.-» faithful faculty, with hopes that they will Y 

i cherish and respect the same. •!• 

¥ Y 

y FIFTH:- To the Sophomores we leave our part in the use of the Education books y 

X in the library and in Mr. Grim's room, presuming they will all read them. X 

% SIXTH:- To the Freshmen we leave a volume on "Parliamentary Procedure" in •{• 

J* order that they may legally impeach their president when they see fit. X 

X SEVENTH:- To Charlie Kendall we leave our notebooks and term papers in order X 

y that he might be able to heat the Girls' Dormitory through the winter months. ¥ 

Y Y 
J* EIGHTH:- To our beloved faculty we will our sincerest wishes and many thanks f 

•> for their council toward us. •{• 

• • ¥ 

•> NINTH:- We hope that the here namod individuals will, in commemoration «f y 

•|« our liberal generosity, accept the following: y 

1. To Roy Barham, Charlie Bissette's physique. y 

2. To Mary Blackman, Ethellynn Brown's ability to gain weight. A 

3. To Velma Gurganus, Clara Bass's ability to "get her man". X 

4. To John Wilson, Elsie Meyer's ability of concentration. y 

5. To Randolph Williams, Margaret Bryan's knowledge of British History •!• 

6. To "Red" Amerson, Vernon Bryant's curly hair. X 

7. To^"Jo" Ange and Mae Canady, a watch that chimes at six o'clock. ¥_ 

8. To Jack Brinson and John Blackman, the pipes, cigars, business "air" and y 
"Bluffing" ability of Sidney S. Eagles. X 

9. To "Red" Rogers, Tom Banks' place as the strongest MAN in school. X 

j|« 10. The seniors of the baseball team leave their ability to play baseball and suits *:* 

% to Clinton Bailey, "Bicycle" Taylor, and Elbert Southard. y 

X • To anyone who needs it, Margaret Barfoot's beauty. X 

2 12. Mrs. Baggette's reserved manner to the garrulous Lee Roy Harris in the X 

y hopes that ha will become more reticent. y 

¥ Y 

Y Y 

Page Thirteen 



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♦ v 

I I 

<j. 13. Mrs. Crockett's ability to make A under Mr. Grimm to Sherman Forrest and ♦,♦ 

X Barton Sitterson. y 

A Y 

A 14. To Sam Freeman, Frances Brantley's unlearned Greek. y 

A Y 

A 15. To "Tin Can Alley" Mr. Teachey leaves his automobile and suggests that »|» 

X they use it at Mrs. Yavorski's discretion. A 

X 16. To Virginia Brendel, "Liz" Oden's privilege of "courting" in private retreats A 

y with hopes that it might prove beneficial to her in the future. X 

V 17. To the Campus Club the seniors leave their influence in helping them to X 

A make their club a chartered one. y 

y V 

y 18. To the "Go Get 'Em and Ketch 'Em Club" we leave Mr. Lindler's room in ¥ 

v ¥ 

A town, and trust that they, through the use of this room, will be able to sleep peace- y 

X fully at night. t*< 



A 19. To Goofy Langston, we leave D. E. Poole's bass voice 



| 
A y 

A 20. To Paul Arline we give permission to put these words to music, providing y 

y he practices outside the city limits and not in the Girls' Dormitory before six A. M. A 

y a 

X There are many other things we would like to bequeath, but they are of such A 



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A 



y nature that we deem it unwise to depart with them. All the other property, as de- ,t 4 

A signated in the beginning, you may dispose of in meeting our divorce proceedings y 

X and funeral expenses. A 

A y 

A We do hereby appoint Miss Myrtie Harper as sole executor of this our Last Will y 

y and Testament. A 



f 



X In witness whereof we hereunto set our hand and seal, and publish and disclose A 

y this to be our last will and testament, this twenty-third day of May, one thousand X 

A nine hundred and thirty-two. ¥ 

X Signed, A 



A 



't* Trudie Dawson, Testatrix. A 



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CLASS POEM 



THE CLASS OF '32 MOVES ON 



I 



Is it true that we have reached our goal 

As we do now pause here ? 
Are hopes and ambitions profitless, 

That we have held so dear? 
No, the class of '32 moves on. 

Can we think of our own selves 

And turn a heedless ear 
To the suffering cries and the poor distress 

Of the humanity near? 
No, the class of '32 moves on. 



Is all this knowledge put in our trust 

To be lost forever 
Sealed away and allowed to rust 

In vaults of lost endeavor? 
No, the class of '32 moves on. 



X 



I 



This is not the goal we seek. 

Can we fail to see 
That its emblems of real service 

We should stand for and be? 
No, the class of '32 moves on. 

Oh, let us do the best we can 

As out in the world today, 
To right the wrongs and help the oppressed 

And debts to Alma Mater pay, 
The class of '32 moves on. 



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-Lou Mashburn, Class Poet. 



Page Fifteen 



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WHO'S WHO IN THE SENIOR CLASS 




LAST NAME KNOWN AS 


HOBBY 


AMBITION 


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Autry 


"Tee Hee' 


Dating 


To be manager of Charles 
Store 


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Bissett 


"Charlie" 


Catching classes on 
time 


To finish college in three 

years 


y 
y 

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Baggett 


Mrs. Elizabeth 


British History 


To teach commercial work 


y 
y 

x 


Brown 


Ethellynn 


Writing term papers 
for Mr. Holsapple 


To live in Fountain 


y 

y 
y 
y 

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Barfoot 


"Bunny Rabbit" 


Playing Tennis 


To become Mr. Grim's 
Secretary 


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Bryan 


Margaret 


Writing Applications 


To take up her abode in 








Black Creek 


Batts 


Evelyn 


Playing "Jazz' 


To sing lik? Rudy Vallee 


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Banks 


Tom 


Tennis 


Coaching at Kinston 


y 
y 
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Bass 


Clara 


Gossiping 


To teach French 


y 
y 

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Dawson 


Trudie 


Fussing at Tom 


To have a home of her own 


y 
y 
y 


Eagles 


The Wort 


Smoking his pipe 


to be a doctor 


y 
y 
y 

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Lindler 


Francis 


Theology 


To be a minister 


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y 
y 


Meyers 


"Mousie" 


Doing the Kerry 
Dance 


To be head of the English 
Department at A. C. C. 


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Bryant 


"General" 


Basketball 


To be just like Mr. Holsapple 


y 


Oden 


"Liz" 


Courtin' Sid 


To teach Geometry 


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Crocket 


Mrs. 


"Grimology 


To teach school 


y 


Gillette 


Bill 


Football 


To graduate 


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Bridgers 


Walter L. 


Singing 


To teach public school music 


y 
y 

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Mashburn 


"Lou" 


Giving midnight 
parties 


To be a poet 


X 


Brantley 


Frances 


Studing Greek 


To get married 


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y 


Soles 


Ila 


Baseball 


To become rich 


Poole 


D. E. 


Debating 


To be a great singer 


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Mr. 


Spanish 


To be a detective 



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Page Sixteen 






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THE JUNIOR CLASS 



We, of the Junior Class, feel that we have had a very pleasant year and a fairly 
successful one. When we began school work in September we were a little bit low 
spirited because several of our last year classmates did not return to be with us. 
During the year, however, three new students joined our ranks and this helped us 
considerably to make up for our past losses. 

We have tried to be good Juniors and uphold the high standards and school 
spirit that have been handed down by the Junior Classes proceading us and we feel 
that this year has made lasting impressions on our minds that will continue to 
bring back many pleasant memories. 



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OFFICERS 

President Jack Brinson 

Vice President Carlton Blackmail 

Secretary and Treasurer Maude Boswell 



Page Seventeen 



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THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Though it seems we are a small and insignificant group, to ourf.-lves we are 
Important and do not wish to be omitted. There is no conceit in our saying this, 
but we do not think we should be judged by our small numbers, and the fact that 
there is no apparent recognition of us, except our gift of the Daisy Chain at com- 
mencement. So with all due respect we thus make our bow- with the hope that 
our ideals and worthiness may some-day be acclaimed. 

Officers: 

President Eva Mae Wnitley 

Vice-President . ... . . Sue Todd 

Secretary-Treasurer '.'..'.' Mabel Cherry 

Student Council Rep guc Todd 



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THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

This year's Frashman class has grown to be the second largest in the history 
of the college. The class is larger, numerically speaking, than any of the other 
classes on the campus. It is composed of students coming from several states in 
th3 Union outside of North Carolina; however, the majority of the members are 
native North Carolinians, most of them coming from Eastern North Carolina. The 
class of '35 arrived on the campus last September, and without any hesitation its 
members found their places in the social, physical, and intellectual life of the college. 
Some of them have participated in the major sports on the campus, even making 
the varsity in several of the sports. A number of the students have been received 
into the various organizations and are malting first-class members and supporters 
thereof. 

The big class event of the year was the banquet held at Dixie Inn the latter 
part of April, where a splendid fellowship and social experience were enjoyed. 

We have learned to love Atlantic Christian College, and we ara looking for- 
ward with great anticipation to coming back to the campus next September. 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Council Rep. 



Clinton Murray 
Robert Cherry 
Mildred Cook 
Eugene Taylor 
Archie Eagles 



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THE HESPERIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

The Hesperian Literary Society, has practically regained its characteristic 
strength and spirit. Although we have had our share of reverses in the last four 
years, we have also had an opportunity to prove our real worth that we are not 
quitters. This year has been a successful one, for our members have bean loyal 
in supporting their society. i 

Our debatsrs, Mr. Jack Brinson and Mr. Lee Roy Harris had the abilities which 
they proved and we, the society have shown our appreciation by our continued sup- 
port to the Hesperian Society. We are after the program cup and we know our 
competitor has competition. 

OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

Pres Jack Brinson Pres Sam Freeman 

Secretary Glennie Daniels Vicc-Pres Glennie Daniels 

Vice-Pres Mabel Cberry Secretary Mildred Cook 

Chaplain Sam Freeman Treasurer Jack Brinson 

Pianist . Eva Mae Whitley Chaplain Eugene Taylor 

Chorister Jack Brinson Pianist Raehal Herring 

Chorister ... Mildred Cook 



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ALETHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

The Alethians have really put themselves into their work this year with plenty 
of enthusiasm and vim. We have some very talented students among our number, 
and the programs at each meeting this year have been exceptionally good. 

Again the Inter-Society Debate was won by the Alethians. Sue Todd and D. E. 
Poole deserve a great deal of credit and the society is proud of them. 

Those who are leaving this year are counting on the underclassmen of ability 
to keep the Alethians on solid rock and wish you even a more successful year in 
1932-33. 

OFFICERS 



FIRST SEMESTER 
President Clara Bass 

Vice Pres Ethellynn Brown 

Secretary Doris Bass 

Treasurer Sue Todd 

Critic Vernon Bryant 

Chaplain Kermit Traylor 

Pianist Velma Gurganus 



SECOND SEMESTER 

President V3rnon Bryant 

Vice Pres Louise Mashburn 

Secretary Ethellynn Brown 

Treasurer Bob Winfield 

Critic Leona Foltz 

Chaplain Harold Tyer 

Pianist Maria Brinson 



SOCIETY DEBATORS: SUE TODD and D. E. POOLE 



Page Twenty-One 



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PHI KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY 



Founded 



COLORS-Gold and White 



John Barclay 



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FLOWER: Daisy 



Dr. E. L. Fox 



CHAP 1 

CLASS OF '32--Sidn3y Eagles. 

CLASS OF '33— Erman Williams, Jack Brinson, Kermit Traylor, and Barton Sitterson 

CLASS OF '34-Clement Miller, Robert Winfield 

CLASS OF '35-Archie Eagles, Louis Bullock, and P. D. Grady, Jr. 



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SIGMA TAU CHI SORORITY 

Sigma Tau Chi Sorority has had a very successful year. In spite of the "re- 
pression" they have succeeded in refurnishing the sorority room and in carrying out 
a rather full social program. Five new members have been added to the chapter 
roll. The annual spring banquet was held May 13th at the Country Club. 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Class of '32— Clara Bass, Elizabeth Oden, Elsie Meyers 

Class of '33— Leona Foltz, Maxine Long 

Class of '34— Eva Mae Whitley, Doris Bass, Frances Stott, Velma Gurganus 

Class of '35— Katheleen Eagles, Marie Scoggins 

Sponsor— Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas 



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FOUNDED-1917 



COLORS-Gold and White 



FLOWER-Yellow Chrysanthemum 






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Page Twonty-Thrtx* 



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SIGMA ALPHA FRATERNITY 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



MOTTO: Semper Est Amicitia 
COLORS: Silver and Lavender 

HOSTESS: Mrs. W. T. Holden 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Cortell King Holsapple, M. A. 



FLOWER: Sweet Pea 



FRATRES N COLLEGIO 
1932 

Vernon M. Brvant 
Charles Brantleigh Bitsecte 
1934 

H. Eldon Rogers 
James Haverson Bradley 



1933 

Henry Floyd Bell 

19P.5 

George Bryan W ; nfiela 

George Amerson 

Russell Lee Stephenson 

Jacob Calvin Taylor 



FRATRES NON IN COLLEGIO 

Francis Denny 

Bruce Riley 



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PHI SIGMA TAU SORORITY 

The Phi Sigma Sorority is the oldest Greek letter organization on the A. C. Col- 
lege campus. It has had a very successful year with the addition of four new mem- 
bers, and with Mrs. Nannelle Hinton as Sponsor. The Sorority meets once each 
week for a joint social and business period. Our social calender has been very full 
this year coming to a climax with the annual banquet which was held on May the 
sixth at the Briggs Hotel. 



OFFICERS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

President Sue Todd 

Vice Pros Trudie Dawson 

Secretary Ray Dupree 

Treasurer Mabel Cherry 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Presidem. Mabel Cherry 

Vice-Pres Sue Todd 

Secretary Hester Strickland 

Treasurer Gler.nie Daniels 



CHAPTER ROLL 

CLASS OF '32 — Trudie Dawson 

CLASS OF '33— Maude Boswell 

CLASS OF '34 — Mabel Cherry, Glennie Daniels, Hester Strickland, Sue Todd 

CLASS OF '35— Maria Brinson, Gladys Charles 

SPONSOR— Mrs. Nannella Hinton 



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Page Xwenty*Five 



49101 



C. L HARDY LIBRARY 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



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Y. W. C. A. 

The Young Women's Christian Association has failed to do many of the things 
this year it would have liked to have done, but we do feel that much good has been 
accomplished. Much interest has been shown in the work and the attendance at 
the weekly meetings has been unusually good. We appreciate the fact that more 
of the town girls have attended this year. They have worked in harmony with us, 
and we believe it will be for the good of all. 

This year we started a Y. W. C. A. store on a small scale. While we did not 
make any large amount, we cleared enough, with that which we made from the 
Bazaar, to send two representatives to Raleigh to the Student Volunteer Conference 
this spring. We have also donated five dollars toward feeding the under-nourished 
children at the Margaret Hearne School. 

The election of officers will be held the first of May. 

Signed: 
Clara Bass, President. 



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Y. M. C. A. 



The Young Men's Christian Association of Atlantic Christian Collegs is an in- 
digenous spiritual campus movement of students and faculty for the following pur- 
poses : aJ 

1. To lead students to faith in God through Jesus Christ. 

2. To lead them into membership and service in the Christian Church. 

3. To promote their growth in Christian faith especially through tha study of 
the Bible and prayer . • 

4. To influence them to devote themselves in united effort with all Christians 
to making the will of Christ effective in human society, and to extend the Kingdom 
of God throughout the world. 

5. To promote throughout the college a positive moral and religious spirit. 

The Y. M. C. A. is striving daily to realize these purposes and aims in the life 
and being of every young man on the campus. It is really and indeed the only or- 
ganization on the campus that all the boys can lay sole claim to. It is loved and 
cherished by every young man on the campus who has any interest in, and vision of, 
the cause of civilization. It continues to grow and increase in strength by leaps 
and bounds as the years go by. 

Signed: 

Kermit Traylor, President. 

Harold Tyre, Vice-President. 

Rabin Rose, Secretary. 



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FELLOWSHIP CLUB 

Fellowship was bagun by a small group of ministerial students. Now it in- 
cludes all students who are seriously trying to develop their personalities that they 
may render the greatest possible service to humanity. 

Our programs have been successful due to the close cooperation of its members 
and we are still progressing. 



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Officers First Somesler 

Pres Jack Brinson 

Vice-Pres Sam Freeman 

Secretary Alma Abernathy 

Pianist Paul Arline, Jr. 

Brother in Faculty- 



Officers Second Semester 

Pres Sam Freeman 

Vice-Pres Paul Arline, Jr. 

ecretary Imogene Herndon 

Pianist Glennie Daniels 

-Mr. C. H. Hamlin 



Vain' Twenty-Eight 



>»»»» »:• 



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♦>♦*♦♦*«♦>♦%♦•«♦*«%♦>♦*♦♦;♦♦:♦♦>♦>♦;♦ 




THE EDUCATION CLUB 



The Education Club is composed of members of the faculty who have special in- 
terest in the department of education and of students who have had ono or more 
courses in the department of education. This year we have permitted the Freshmen 
to join us. 

The aims and purposes of the club are: To develop and make effective the per- 
sonality of its members; to promote a close fellowship among members of the depart- 
ment of education; to elevate to a higher appreciation of teaching as a profession by 
encouraging more throrough preparation and the acceptance of higher ethical stan- 
dards, and to discuss educational problems of interest to all good citizens, especially 
those who are planning to teach. 

The Education Club meets semi-monthly for a program consisting of lectures 
by men and women who are workers in the field of education, talks on different 
phases of education by the members, and group discussion. Some of the most 
noted speakers this year were: Mr. C. H. Hamlin, Mr. C. K. Holsapple, and Mr. J. M. 
Waters. 

We do not neglect the social side of life, however, as we all look forward to the 
a n nual beefsteak supper in the spring. 

President Trudie Dawson 

Vice-President Elizabeth Oden 

Secretary Bettie White 

Treasurer Frances Stott 

Program Committee Sue Todd, Mabel Cherry 

Left to right. 



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THE GLEE CLUB 



The Glee Club's activities this year have included a program given at the State 
Convention of the Disciples of Christ at Newborn in November, a program of sacred 
music at the Christmas Vesper Service, a Broadcast from W. P. T. F. in February, 
and programs given at several churches in Eastern North Carolina, including Green- 
ville, Wilson's Mills, Kcnly, Kinston, Washington, Raleigh, Pleasant Union, Ayden and 
Wilson. The personnel of this year's club follows: Clara Bass, Doris Bass, Ethellynn 
Brown, Mildred Cook, Mae Canady, Martha Edmonston, Velma Gurganus, Eva Louise 
Shelton, Frances Stott, Sue Todd, Betty White, N. Paul Arline, Jr., Jack Brinson, Ira 
Langston, Clement Miller, Clinton Murray, D. E. Poole, Director; Elizabeth Edwards 
Yavorski, Accompanist; Mrs. Nannelle Hinton. 



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BASKETBALL 1931-1932 

Completing their first whole season under the efficient tutelage of Coach Hodges, 
the 1931-1932 edition of Atlantic Christian' basketball team reflected in its changed 
style of play his influence. A not unimpressive list of victories, cleaner play, finer 
sportsmanship, and a far better team and school spirit characterized a season of ath- 
letic depression. 

Left to right. 

Kneeling: Bissette; Banks, Captain; Bryant. 

2nd. Row: Hodges, Coach; Rogers; Traylor; R. Winfield; Gillette; Harris, Manager. 

3rd. Row: Williams, Amerson, Bell. 



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BASEBALL 1932 



Baseball, missing from the campus for the past several years, was brought back 
this year largely through the efforts of Professor Hodges. Student response has 
been ready and enthusiastic, and a strong team has been produced. 



1st Row: R. Winfield; Barnes; Banks; Bell; Amerson; Strickland; Bryant. 

2nd Row: Mallison; Southard; Rogers; Bailey; Murray; Miller. 

3rd Row: Harris, Manager; Aycock; Ballance; Godwin; E. Williams, Kavanaugh; 

Gillette; Hodges, Coach. 

Sitting: Clara Bass; Leona Foltz; Mrs. Baggetto; Sue Todd. 

Standing: Kermit Traylor; D. E. Poole; Jaspar Bassart, President; Floyd Bell; Archie 

Eagles. 



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THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

One of the most effective organizations on the campus during the past year has 
been the Student Council representing tba judicial body of the Student Association. 
The first step toward such an organization was made in November, 1927, by the Y. 
M. C. A. which was particularly interested in the honor system. During the year 
1931-32 there has been an amendment to the honor code which places more respon- 
sibility upon the student body. The Association is also quite proud of the fact that 
it was able to send a representative to the Natonal Students' Federation Congress 
at Toledo last Decembsr. 

The purpose of the Student Association is to "promote closer cooperation be- 
tween faculty and student body in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the school; 
to develop within the student body a greater sense of responsibility and a finer col- 
lege spirit; to make efficient the honor system; and to encourage and train for more 
democratic living." We feel that this purpose has been more fully carried out 
during the past nine months than during any preceding year. However, we do not 
intend to stop here, but plans are already underway for next year. 

The officers for the year 1931-1932 have been: President, Jasper Basart; Vice- 
President, Mrs. Elizabeth Baggett; Secretary, Leona Foltz. The Council is also 
composed of: Archie Eagles, Freshman Class; Sue Todd, Sophomore Class; Floyd 
Bell, Junior Class; D. E. Poole, Senior Class; Clara Bass, Y. W. C. A.; and Hermit 
Traylor, Y. M. C. A. 



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Page Thirty Three 






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STAFF 



Front Row 

Business Manager, Sidney S. Eagles 
Social Editor, Lou Mashbum 
Organization Editor, Sue Todd 
Literary Editor, Marjorie Ellis 



Back Row 

Ex-change Editor, Vernon Bryant 
Joke Editor, Ira Langston 
Editor-in-chief, J. W. Blackburn, Jr. 
Sports Editor, Chas. Bissette 



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The Staff wishes to express its thanks to everyone who has aided in making 
possible this publication. It has worked under somewhat adverse circumstances. 
Yet it is proud of its opportunity of service. The hearty response of the Student 
Body and Faculty is commendable. 

The Business Manager and Editor wish to thank especially their assistants for 
the untiring efforts and endless cooperation rendered. 



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<<<<<<^SS^WS.~\>*A» 



Vujfe Thirty-Fwiii 1 



I CALENDAR OF THE YEAR 1 

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y September 7 School opened $ 

y* September 11 Church Reception ,*! 

X September 11 Y. W. C. A. Reception £ 

*t* October 16 Faculty Reception «| 

y October 30 Halloween Party A 

•*♦ October 31 Home coming Day I*! 

X November 4 Glee Club at State Convention £ 

g November 26 Thanksgiving Holiday £ 

y December 13 White Gift Service A 

•5 December 16 Christmas Tea, Mrs. Lucas A* 

X December 16 Y. W. C. A. Pageant $ 

V December 17 Christmas Tree and Party «*• 

December 18 Christmas Recess .♦. 

January 4 School Re-opened **' 

January 20-23 Mid-Term Examinations 

February 13 Valentine Party A 

% February 18 Glee Club Broadcast, W. P. T. F. *< 

March 10 Tumbling Meet **) 

March 15 Miss Mary Apple, Contralto "I* 

March 17 Inter-Society Debate A 

March 25-28 Easter Holiday >* 

April 8 Junior Senior Banquet, Briggs Hotel JJ 

g April 12- 16 Religious Emphasis Week A 

.*. April 29 Phi Kappa Alpha Banquet, Country Club A 

X May 2 May Day *< 

*** May 4 Miss Martha Edmonston, Junior voice recital *j* 

A May 6 Phi Sigma Tau Banquet, Briggs Hotel y 

A May 12 Ethlynn Brown, Senior voice recital A 

g May 13 Sigma Tau Chi Banquet, Country Club *< 

»{• May 14 Sigma Alpha Banquet, Country Club y 

% May 18-21 Final Examinations $ 



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X May 21 Poetry Contest, Inter-Society Program A 

y May 22 Baccalaureate Sermon V 

A May 23 Class Day Exercises A 

'/, May 23 Commsnccment Play '/, 

£' May 24 Commencement 'j| 

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c<<k»k<«x»X"J~>>X">X">>!«>>':«;">: 




MAY DAY FESTIVAL 



PROGRAM 

Processional 

Welcome sweet springtime 

Archery tournament 

Coronation of the May Queen 

Sellinger's round, an English country dance 

Court entertainers 

Kerry dance 

Highland Fling 

Flamborough Sword 

Irish Lilt 

Minuet 

May Pole dance 



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Ql^MiWBiGliltWM' 



DESIGNERS 

RETOUCHERS 

ILLUSTRATORS 





HALFTONES 
LINE AND 
COLOR WORK 



An Uptodate Fully Equipped Photo- 
Engraving Plant, To Handle The 
Engravings of The Progressive 
Advertisers and Publishers 

This Is The Day of Illustrative 

Advertising 

ILLUSTRATE ADVERTISE 

Third Floor Mechanics Bank Building 

Phone 64 P. O. Box 553 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

H. M. GAINES, Manager 



*->>>x.<k~xk^-><kK"X«>:k-:~>:k<~:<":~:^^^ 



PICTURES IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

Holden's Studio 



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WILSON, N. C. 



DUPLICATE PRINTS MAY BE SECURED AT ANY TIME 



Pagv Thirty-Eight 



WILSON THEATRE 

108 W.NASH ST. 



CAROLINA THEATRE 

128 S. TARBORO ST. 

Publix Kinccy Theatres 

of North Carolina, Inc. 



WILSON'S GREATEST 
ENTERTAINMENT 



Page Thirty-Nine 



4*